Looking Back at 2007

I finally found some time to put together a list of the projects that I have worked on in 2007 and some highlights from 2006.

In 2007, I have had a chance to work on many different challenging and fun projects that required me to take many different roles. I have sharpen up my programming skills greatly this year and have fully adopted The New York Times’ design style.

One of the skills I have acquired while working at The New York Times is the ability to deal with very intense deadlines. I have learned how to organize my projects, so that they are flexible for last minute changes and easy to maintain in the future.

Another thing that I have accomplished in 2007 is the code library that I built in Flash. Working with few other people, I have coded most of the standard components that we use here at The Times. That helps reduce the production time greatly and leave me time to think more about the design and the content rather than the code.

2008 is an exciting year. We have the Olympics coming up and then the election. There will be plenty of large projects for me to chew on and I am happy about that.

I hope you enjoy what I have put together. Please feel free to leave me some feedbacks. I would love to hear what you think.

In Their Ads, the Words They Use
Programming, Design
In Their Ads, the Words They Use

The tag cloud interactive shows the most common words used in presidential candidates ads.

Pummeling Cancer With Protons
3D, Animation
3D diagram of the proton accelerator at University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute

Proton radiation therapy is potentially a better way to treat cancer because it has fewer side effects, but the technology is still very expensive. The University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute took eight years and $125 million to build, and it can serve up to 150 patients a day.

Bay Area’s Niche Neighborhoods
Map, Programming, Design
Bay Area’s Niche Neighborhoods

Hardware companies have clustered around industry leaders low in Silicon Valley, as Internet advertising and design has taken root in San Francisco.

Counting the Displaced
Map, Programming, Design
Counting the Displaced

On average, China has built one large dam every day during the last 50 years, displacing 1,100 people each time.

The interactive map is a part of the fourth installment of Choking on Growth, a series of articles and multimedia examining the impact of China’s pollution crisis, that I have been working on with other people at The New York Times.

A Map of the Oil World
Map, Programming, Design
A Map of the Oil World

In 2006, Saudi Arabia was by far the largest producer of oil, followed by Russia and United States. On average, the United States consumed 20.6 million barrels per day, which made it the largest oil consumer in the world.

This interactive map shows the world oil producers, oil consumers and oil suppliers to the United States, and ranks them from the largest to the smallest.

Interactive Tour of Mount Kilimanjaro
Animation, Audio, Video, Design
Interactive Tour of Mount Kilimanjaro

Every year, thousands of people set to climb Mount Kilimanjaro, but about a quarter of them fail before reaching the summit. The rest, who succeed, become very ill from latitude sickness.

Is it worth the efforts? Check out Tom Bissell’s account of his painful and exhausting climb to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro.

Where the Lottery Money Goes
Design, Programming
Where the Lottery Money Goes

Every year, state lotteries are selling billions of dollars worth of tickets. A big part of that money is supposed to go back into funding education or at least that is what we are led to believe. Recent research from The New York Times shows that most of the money from lotteries is actually used to fund the games themselves. The lottery money accounts for only between less than 1 percent to 5 percent of the total funding for K-12 education last year.

The graphics Hannah Fairfield, Ron Nixon and I did shows where the money from ticket sales goes and lottery spending per resident for the 42 states and the District of Columbia that have lottery programs.

Sea Ice in Retreat
Design
Sea Ice in Retreat

This summer saw a record-breaking loss of Arctic sea ice.

Where Water Is Scarce
Design
Where Water Is Scarce

Water-scarce areas in China are among the most densely populated and economically active in the world.

Layers of Ownership
Animation, Audio, Design
Layers of Ownership

Formation Properties purchases the Habana Healthcare Center and 48 other Florida nursing homes in 2002 and contracted with executives backed by Warburg Pincus to manage the facilities. Those executives created a complex corporate structure around each nursing home. As a result, many profits were shielded from lawsuits.

Listen to reporter Charles Duhigg explaining the complicated structure of the Habana Health Care nursing home and its facilities.

A Guide to ‘The Age of Rembrandt’
Design, Programming
A Guide to ‘The Age of Rembrandt’

“The Age of Rembrandt: Dutch Painting in the Metropolitan Museum of Art,” an exhibition of the museum’s complete Dutch collection of 228 paintings, stretches through 12 galleries. It’s a lot to take in. Here are some highlights. Holland Cotter, art critic of The New York Times, narrates.

Running Behind Schedule
Design, Programming
Running Behind Schedule

Transportation Department records show that flights on certain routes are nearly always delayed by 15 minutes or more, making them officially late. In the year ended June 30, 121 regularly scheduled flights were late more than 70 percent of the time. The vast majority of these arrive or depart from Newark or J.F.K. airports.

Home Prices Across the Nation
Design, Programming
Home Prices Across the Nation

Compare local real estate markets to the national median.

Serena Williams’s Professional Career
Design, Programming
Serena Williams's Professional Career

After about six years as a top 20 player, Serena Williams slid to No. 140 before a comeback leading up to the 2007 Australian Open.

Growing Biologic Drugs, From Vial to Vat
3D, Animation
Growing Biologic Drugs, From Vial to Vat

Unlike conventional chemical pharmaceuticals, the biologics produced at Genentech’s Vacaville, Calif., facility are proteins, made by living cells. The cells are grown in vats, similar to winemaking.

Regional Differences in Costs and Care
Map, Design
Regional Differences in Costs and Care

Geographic variation in quality and cost of health care is a result of many complicating factors. these maps, which use 2003 Medicare patient data, show the variability of cost in the Medicare system and the rates of several kinds of surgery, amoking the factors affecting rate variation by region are the health of the population, the economy, the availability of and access to care and the methods for care and traetment.

I’d Like to Sell the World a Coke
Map, Design
I'd Like to Sell the World a Coke

Though Coca-Cola’s market share has slipped, it is still the world’s leading carbonated cola, Coke is far ahead of pepsi in much of Europe and South America, but Pepsi dominates in some Asian markets.

Rising Prices at the Pump
Map, Chart, Design
Rising Prices at the Pump

The average cost of gas has reached $3.22 a gallon, close to the previous peak (adjusted for inflation). But the price varies widely by region.

When Carbon Is Currency
Map, Programming, Design
When Carbon Is Currency

Ten states have joined to create the first mandatory carbon cap-and-trade program in the United States.

Putting Pay For Perfomance to the Test
Design, Programming
Putting PayfFor Perfomance to the Test

At some Companies, changes in chief executives’ pay roughly corresponded with changes in their shareholders’ total return last year. Several exeptions were in favor of shareholders, while other outliers favored C.E.O’s.

The Next Sudoku?
Design, Programming, Game
The Next Sudoku?

Kakuro is simply elegant, nurikabe ends in a rush of excitement, while masyu has no numbers. Could one of these three logic puzzles from Nikoli, a puzzle magazine publisher, become as popular as sudoku?

8 Out of 8 (and Not Yet 8)
Design
8 Out of 8 (and Not Yet 8)

On July 16, 1983, a day before Terence Tao’s eight birthday, Ken Clements, an expert on the education of mathematically gifted children, visited the boys’ home to evaluate his abilities. As part of the evaluation, he gave Terry the following set of written questions. Terry answered orally, without writing anything down. All his answers were correct.

Dissecting the Game’s Most Feared Swing
Design, Audio
Dissecting the Game's Most Feared Swing

Don Long, the Philadelphia Phillies’ minor league hitting coordinator, talks about the evolution and the components of Ryan Howard’s swing.

Want to Be a Superstar Athlete? Build More Myelin
Animation, Illustrations
Want to Be a Superstar Athlete? Build More Myelin

While favorable genetics and a well-conditioned body are essential, some scientists believe that physiological changes in the brain that take place during repetitive practice at a young age may make the difference between a world-class athlete and the rest of us.

The Super Ad Bowl: Two Decades of Players
Programming
The Super Ad Bowl: Two Decades of Players

An interactive feature that show super bowl ads categorized by industry for more than two decades.

Refining Vision Surgery for a Sharper Focus
Animation
Refining Vision Surgery for a Sharper Focus

The newwest technology in Lasik surgery, commonly called custom Lasik, provides additional accuracy and personalization to the eye correction procedure. Wavescan technology creates a “fingerprint” of the patient’s vision, precise enough to capture subtle anomalies in each eye. A guided laser can cut a thinner, more uniform flap, while a corrective laser with variable size beams can reshape the cornea with increased accuracy, keeping on target even as the eye moves. But as with all corrective surgeries, complications can arise.

The 18th Green: The Tillinghast Test
Programming, Design
The 18th Green: The Tillinghast Test

A.W. Tillinghast designed the West Course at Winged Foot in the early 1920′s, and it has been challenging the world’s best golfers in every era since. Many of the elements of his design philosophy – what he offers golfers and how he tests them – can be found on and around the 18th green.

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